Nitrous Oxide

It seems today that every dentist is a cosmetic dentist. This represents a fairly recent phenomenon. Since cosmetic dentistry is not a specialty recognized by the American Dental Association, how does one determine who's good, and who's not?

Below are four criteria that I would recommend using in your selection of a cosmetic dentist:


  • EDUCATION: There are many continuing education courses offered in cosmetic dentistry, and most of them are quite good. A cosmetic dentist must be dedicated to expanding his learning and increasing his knowledge through regular participation in these courses. This is a critical component of a cosmetic dentist's development of his or her own philosophy and technical expertise.

  • EXPERIENCE: While education is extremely important, it is of little relevance if not used in practice. The more cases a cosmetic dentist completes, the more capable that professional becomes in visualizing results, anticipating challenges, and knowing which techniques will produce the optimum result for the client. Cosmetic dentistry is extremely technical, and a clinician's skill set develops over time.

  • LAB SUPPORT: Most cosmetic dental cases involve the fabrication of a porcelain crown and/ or veneer. These items are made in a dental laboratory by specially trained personnel. This dental laboratory technician, or ceramist, is responsible for translating the cosmetic dentist's specific information on your case into a well-crafted and natural-looking product. In this sense, the ceramist is a true artist. In order to achieve a high level of proficiency, this individual must have benefited from the experiences of completing many cases. Ideally, the cosmetic dentist should have the same highly skilled ceramist complete all of his or her cases. This scenario would result in consistently beautiful results. In order to achieve this, the cosmetic dentist must have an established relationship with a high-quality dental laboratory.

  • REFERENCES: A cosmetic dentist should be able to provide a list of clients on whom he or she has completed cosmetic procedures. This is the best way for a potential client to gauge the patient's experience with their cosmetic dentist and their degree of satisfaction with the final product.

Hopefully, these guidelines will help in the process of selecting the cosmetic dentist who is right for you

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Dental patient relaxing.Some people fail to receive the benefits of modern dental treatment because of a simple yet seemingly overwhelming problem: Fear. It isn't uncommon to have a little anxiety about an upcoming dental procedure. But if your fears have kept you away from the dental office when you know you really should go — take heart! Conscious sedation with nitrous oxide can help you lose that anxiety, and make the whole experience so stress-free that you may not even remember it when it's over.

Nitrous oxide, a colorless gas with a slightly sweet odor, has been used in medicine for about a century; however its outdated nickname, “laughing gas,” is undeserved. It's a safe and effective method of administering conscious sedation — which means that you'll stay awake during the procedure. But when nitrous oxide is used in combination with a local anesthetic, you won't feel pain or anxiety. In fact, many patients report a feeling of well-being during this type of sedation. All bodily functions remain normal during the administration of nitrous oxide, and its effects wear off quickly afterwards.

How Is Nitrous Oxide Administered?

Nitrous Oxide.As a form of conscious sedation, nitrous oxide is inhaled through a small mask that fits comfortably over your nose. The gas is mixed with oxygen as it is being delivered, and both gases are always kept at a level that is safe for the body. In just a few minutes, you may start to experience a floating sensation, and perhaps some tingling in the hands and feet. That's a sign that the sedation is working. Once it has been verified that you're calm and comfortable, and that the dose is correct, your dental procedure can begin.

Nitrous oxide itself isn't a substitute for a local anesthetic — it's considered an anxiolytic, which means it makes anxiety disappear. For some procedures, you may still need an anesthetic injection. The difference is, you won't mind. Yet, you won't be asleep — you'll be able to speak, be aware of what's going on, and you will remain in control during the procedure. In fact, the dose can be fine-tuned to just the level of sedation you need.

When the procedure is over, the flow of nitrous oxide is decreased to zero, and the oxygen may be increased. After resting in the chair for a few minutes, you'll be able to sit up, and soon you can resume normal activities like driving. Although the experience has been compared to “having a couple of drinks,” there is very little “hangover” effect afterward.

Who Can Benefit From Nitrous Oxide?

Most people whose anxiety would otherwise keep them out of the dental chair can benefit from conscious sedation with nitrous oxide. Before beginning treatment, we will take a complete medical history, including your use of both prescription and non-prescription medications. If you are pregnant, have COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) or some other pulmonary diseases, or are taking certain drugs, it may not be right for you. However, if you feel that you would benefit from a more stress-free experience in the dental office, ask about nitrous oxide conscious sedation.

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