Root Canal Surgery (Apicoectomy)

It seems today that every dentist is a cosmetic dentist. This represents a fairly recent phenomenon. Since cosmetic dentistry is not a specialty recognized by the American Dental Association, how does one determine who's good, and who's not?

Below are four criteria that I would recommend using in your selection of a cosmetic dentist:


  • EDUCATION: There are many continuing education courses offered in cosmetic dentistry, and most of them are quite good. A cosmetic dentist must be dedicated to expanding his learning and increasing his knowledge through regular participation in these courses. This is a critical component of a cosmetic dentist's development of his or her own philosophy and technical expertise.

  • EXPERIENCE: While education is extremely important, it is of little relevance if not used in practice. The more cases a cosmetic dentist completes, the more capable that professional becomes in visualizing results, anticipating challenges, and knowing which techniques will produce the optimum result for the client. Cosmetic dentistry is extremely technical, and a clinician's skill set develops over time.

  • LAB SUPPORT: Most cosmetic dental cases involve the fabrication of a porcelain crown and/ or veneer. These items are made in a dental laboratory by specially trained personnel. This dental laboratory technician, or ceramist, is responsible for translating the cosmetic dentist's specific information on your case into a well-crafted and natural-looking product. In this sense, the ceramist is a true artist. In order to achieve a high level of proficiency, this individual must have benefited from the experiences of completing many cases. Ideally, the cosmetic dentist should have the same highly skilled ceramist complete all of his or her cases. This scenario would result in consistently beautiful results. In order to achieve this, the cosmetic dentist must have an established relationship with a high-quality dental laboratory.

  • REFERENCES: A cosmetic dentist should be able to provide a list of clients on whom he or she has completed cosmetic procedures. This is the best way for a potential client to gauge the patient's experience with their cosmetic dentist and their degree of satisfaction with the final product.

Hopefully, these guidelines will help in the process of selecting the cosmetic dentist who is right for you

schedule an appointment, contact us.

Occasionally, root canal treatment proves unsuccessful at resolving an infection in the tissues near a tooth's roots. That's when a minor surgical procedure called an apicoectomy may be recommended. Because this procedure is often performed with the aid of a microscope and other small specialized tools, it's considered a type of endodontic microsurgery. Probably the most common type of root canal surgery, an apicoectomy involves removing a small portion of the apex (tip) of the tooth's root, along with any surrounding hard or soft tissue that may be infected.

What would cause you to need an apicoectomy? There could be several reasons, including a canal that is blocked or inaccessible, an anatomical irregularity, or a fracture or crack in the tooth's roots. The procedure is normally only recommended after one or more root canal treatments have been attempted, and have failed. Since this type of problem generally occurs near the apex of the root, the procedure is often an effective way to treat a persistent infection.

Root canal surgery apicoectomy.Before an apicoectomy procedure, diagnostic images (such as X-rays) of the affected tooth and surrounding bone, a careful review of your medical history including medications you take (both prescription and non-prescription), and other factors are reviewed. If an apicoectomy is recommended, the reasons for it will be explained to you.

The Apicoectomy Procedure

Root canal surgery is usually performed under local anesthesia such as a numbing shot, so you won't feel any pain. To begin the procedure, a small incision is made in the gum, and the infection at the end of the tooth's roots is exposed. The infected tissue is then removed, along with a few millimeters of the root tip itself. A dye may be used to help make cracks or fractures easy to see; if we discover that the tooth is fractured, it may be better to extract (remove) it at this time instead of completing the apicoectomy.

Next, a microscope and light are used to examine the tiny canals. They will be cleaned with an ultrasonic instrument, then filled with an inert material and sealed up with a small filling. To finish the procedure, a small bone graft may be placed at the affected site, and then the gum tissue covering the tooth's root will be sutured (sewn) closed. X-rays may also be taken as the procedure nears completion. Afterwards, instructions on postoperative care will be given, and you'll go home. Most apicoectomies take about 30 to 90 minutes to complete.

Following the procedure, you may experience some swelling and soreness in the area that was treated. Over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (such as ibuprofen) are usually all that's needed to control any discomfort. You can probably return to normal activities the following day, but you may want to avoid eating hard or crunchy foods or brushing vigorously for a few days afterwards. If your sutures aren't self-dissolving, you will be asked to return in about a week to have them removed.

The Goal: Saving Your Tooth

Although apicoectomy is typically a safe and effective procedure, there are slight risks with any type of minor surgery. That's why apicoectomies are not recommended unless further root canal treatment won't be effective. An alternative treatment in most cases would be extraction of the tooth. However, our goal as dentists is to help you preserve your natural teeth for as long as possible.

While there are excellent methods of tooth replacement (such as dental implants), these involve further and more complex treatments, and they can be costly. An apicoectomy is generally a permanent and cost-effective solution which can help the tooth last for the rest of your life.

Related Articles

Root Canal Retreatment - Dear Doctor Magazine

Root Canal Retreatment As occasionally happens with any dental or medical procedure, a tooth may not heal as anticipated after a root canal treatment. In these cases, it's often possible to save the tooth with a second root canal procedure... Read Article

Root Canal Treatment - Dear Doctor Magazine

Common Concerns About Root Canal Treatment The term “root canal” can send shivers down many a spine. However, preconceived notions that root canal treatment is filled with pain and discomfort are nothing more than outdated myths. In fact, root canal treatment doesn't cause pain but actually relieves it... Read Article